Class Notes for Week Ten

  • Big Question: How do we hone in on what’s real? What are the markers for credible sources? How do I create work that will pass other people’s crap detector?
  • Markers that Typical Students Use: Good format, Grammer, Citations.
  • Scholarly Articles are important, but it’s also important to broaden to other types of sources.
  • It’s a good place to start out at the library.
  • What are some of the problems?
    • Not correct information.
    • May have a different agenda.
    • May be out of date (abandoned information).
    • Anyone reach a public audience.
    • With Scholarly Articles, only those who are established are published. New voices are less likely to be published. (If the shape of knowledge could change more rapidly studies, such as vaccines causing autism, would be eradicated.) Although it is important because they try to make the sources as credible as possible and not intentionally deceiving. The main message is to consider the author before assuming it’s correct.
  • It’s on the reader to determine credibility. Not the publisher. Not the author. It’s up to you.
  • Additionally, sometimes a whole text or author isn’t incorrect, sometimes it’s just certain sections.
  • How to we change as a culture to find credible sources. (Especially interesting in light of “fake news”.)
  • What are some ways we can verify the information?
    • Research the author. Is someone putting their name on it? “who is” search.
    • Shows a depth of expertise on one subject.
    • References/Sources. (MOST IMPORTANT!!!!!)
  • No one of these things is sufficent for discrediting site. They are just red flags.
  • .org = organization with a public mission (non-profit organization).

Class Notes for Week Nine

  • First, annotated bibliography is due Friday by midnight.
  • Read Unit 3 Readings (go ahead and do a reading response for bonus points.)
  • You can include pictures for points in multi-modality.
  • You can use up to two entries for the annotated bibliography.
  • Live Assistance: chat with a professional about how to do certain reference related things (only open for certain hours)
  • There are subject librarians assigned to every subject offered at GSU
    • WILL NOT DO RESEARCH FOR YOU.
  • Subject Librarians create research guides.
    • Click on “Research Guides” tab.
    • Click dropdown to English.
    • Click “Freshman English” for help with this class.
  • If you click on the icon it will bring you back to the homepage.
  • CARP (Used to evaluate sources). When writting look at…
    • Currency
    • Authority
    • Reliability
    • Purpose
  • Evaluating information is so crucial, because everyone will use this skill no matter their career or where life takes them.
  • Popular magazines are what you would find on a newsstand. Are written for the general public, so usually leave out jargon.
  • Scholarly articles require prerequisite knowledge and are peer reviewed.
  • Catalog is a database that shows what the GSU library owns.
  • Try to use the advanced search option to be more descriptive.
  • Try to narrow or expand to get 20 resulting sources.
    • Look at searches may help provide ideas.
  • Each item has a specific call number (sort of like an address). Always copy the entire number!
  • When you see a period it’s actually a decimal. (Use logical-mathematical skills.)
  • Can check them out at other libraries with your panther card.

Class Notes for Week Eight

Built Environment Description Notes:

  • Make sure it is broken up into readable paragraphs.
  • Go beyond just describing what kind of evidence was there, to actually detailing what was found there. (Be super descriptive.)
  • Make sure there is a clear focus on a detail. For example, color, people, etc.
  • Additionally, make sure there is a clear distinction between objective and subjective. The objective is from the perspective of ANYONE that would go to your space at that time. On the other hand, is your perspective and what details were specific to you and your thoughts.
  • Need to try to balance between pictures and text. (A picture isn’t always worth a thousand words.)
  • Need to think about accessibility. Maybe include rich descriptions, for those that are visually impaired. (There are all kinds of different visual impairments, such as colorblindness.)
  • Using the text to emphasize what you want the reader to focus on in the image.
  • Need to be written from the public forum.
  • Think about how your title may affect the reader’s response.
  • For revisions, revise based on the feedback and then reflect on what you did and why in a blog post. (If you get no points just resubmit.)

Zotero

  • Two components: online “in the cloud” or offline a plugin you can use for words
  • First, create an account and then log in.
  • Using Zotero you can access the sources from the GSU library from your personal files.
  • If you have the tools, you can save the actual resource using “coins”. After this, it will save it to the library.
  • You can drag the source into your word document and it will give you the correct bibliography with any format. (Makes it really easy to generate a work cited page.

Annotated Bibliography

  • Two components: citation (the source) and then the paragraph (why you’re using it (justification), summary).
  • Make sure you are specific in your summaries and not just generalizing information. Next, justify why you are using this source. It may also be a good idea to note biases that may be present, if necessary. Also, explain how this relates to your other sources.
  • First one has only 5 entries.
  • The next one is the 5 plus an additional 5.
  • Look at her website for detailed description of the project.
  • Brainstorming Ideas
    • How has the rapid growth of the city infringed on the organization and historical preservation of sites throughout Atlanta?
      • Oakland Cemetary (Relate to Parting Ways)
      • Pemberton House
      • Destruction and Construction
      • Scattered downtown (business vs. residential)
  • Create a new post entitled “Annotated Bibliography”.

Class Notes for Week Seven

Reading Response:

  • Have to have at least 10 annotations.
  • Is it rhetorically aware? Remember to summarize and bring the two texts together.
  • Can I tell from the annotation that you have read the texts? (Don’t just define a word.)
  • You must make a claim and then cite passages or give a summary to provide evidence.
  • You want to try to make a strong connection between your annotations and texts. Think about the bridge between claims and textual evidence.
  • The organization category is focused on a similar thread that runs through all the annotations. When revising try to make this clearer. For example, if a question is posed in the text maybe the next would answer that question.
  • Remember to integrate images and links into the annotations (a.k.a. multi-modality).
  • Dr. Wharton stated that she cares more about substance, rather than small grammar issues.
  • We plan our annotations to be linear, but this may not be necessarily possible. Dr. Whaton looks for transition words or phrases that refer to previous annotations.
  • In the summary make sure to cite it in your supplemental text. Not necessary for every annotation, but maybe provide a link. This would get you points for multi-modality.
  • In an essay, we sometimes depend on sequence, when we should really focus on clarification. The annotation allows us to practice logical connections and incorporating secondary sources.
  • Dr. Wharton needs to see an effort to revise and evidence of the process.
  • Can include personal experiences in the annotations. Also, can include questions and criticize the article. Further, you can look at the writing. Where was it confusing? What are some illogical fallacies?
  • Create and think about a balance between visual and text, instead of supplemental.
  • You can earn revision points on major projects. (Try to find time to incorporate pictures into the body of text for BED 1 and improve modality in Reading Response 1). Also, you need to write a reflection on how you improved the project.)
  • Reading Response 2 is due on Friday! 🙂
  • You may ask her whether you should do revisions for participation points or for her to regrade your assignment.

Kathleen G. Scholl and Gowri Betrabet Gulwadi:

  • Learning is connected to the learning environment (i.e. college campuses).
  • Campus affect learning outcomes and campus green spaces improve student learning.
  • Mainly looks at restorative value and attention.
  • Paying attention is kind of an exertion the way you can have physical exertion.
  • Having somewhere like the quad is just as important as places like the computer lab for student achievement.
  • This argument justifies the recreational expense of having these green spaces.
  • Criteria for beauty (subjective): architecture, nature, unique, isolated/self-contained
  • Scholl and Gulwadi have a very specific picture of an ideal college in mind. (These colleges also tend to be costly, private, elite/selective.)
  • These ideas may be somewhat unrealistic for urban colleges, like GSU.
  • One critic is that they have a generally good argument, but how do we address that at GSU?
  • Be careful about making assumptions when talking about the quality of a space.
  • Addressing the attention concept, just because you don’t go outside doesn’t mean your attention will fail. (This is a very subjective view.)
  • If green spaces are good for everyone, why would we be exclusive?
  • The author’s argument is somewhat narrow. (Need to think about other solutions that would be a better for the community.)
  • Need to think about who the changes.
  • Their conception of the type of student is very narrow.
  • Looked at Stadiumville and the controversies that surrounded it.